Faye

Deep in the mountains, a maiden awaits,
Confined to a tower, a dragon at guard.
Imprisoned, until a great knight should arrive
To challenge the dragon and challenge his fate,
Defeating the wyrm and releasing its ward

And taking the maiden to wife.
High in her tower, young Faye kept alert
For the bridegroom to one day appear.
In study of music and God’s Holy Word
She waited there year after year.

From deep in the forest, Sir Hector rode forth,
Determined to rescue the unhappy Faye,
With helmet and shield and so mighty a sword
The hero had honored the blade with a name:
Valor he called it, and with it in hand
Sir Hector had vanquished the fiercest of beasts.
So reaching the tower, he issued command
To the dragon to yield him the maiden’s release.
The dragon did not, breathing fire instead,
But excellent Hector shied not from the wyrm:
With Valor he rendered a cut to its head,
Which winced to receive the fell strength of his arm.
The contest was close, and Faye watched from her tower,
Adoring the hero so brave in the fight,
While the battle raged on for another two hours,
When Hector at last put the dragon to flight.

But the hero had yet one more trial to come:
A question burned on to Faye’s lips;
Before he could take the good Faye to his home
She demanded him “Answer me this:
Tell me, What is the greatest pursuit for a man?”

“To win immortality,” Hector replied,
“Through Glory and Honor and Deeds of Renown!
For a Name will live on when the body had died,
Yea, everything else will the grave surely hide,
But by his good Name will the worthy be known.”

For Sir Hector, the hero, Faye’s heart gave a leap,
Such a man for a husband delighted poor Faye—
But her spirit dissented, and sent him away
To remain in unrescuéd grief.

For her spirit resisted the unfitting mate,
But her heart was concerned that her hour grew late;
For while others enchanted remained young to wait
Patient Faye had to age just like any poor waif.
Thus her heart said Choose now! let us two become one!
But her spirit knew better, and wouldn’t be won.
From her tower Faye watched as Sir Hector went home,
Wondering, hoping another would come.

High in her tower, another year past,
The dragon on duty once more,
Playing music and reading the Word everlasting
Poor Faye kept her watch as before.

And deep in the forest, Sir Richard rode forth,
Determined to rescue the unhappy Faye,
With helmet and shield and so mighty a sword
The hero had honored the blade with a name:
Romance he called it, and with it equipped
Sir Richard had conquered the vilest offenders.
So reaching the tower this weapon he gripped
And offered the dragon a chance to surrender.
The dragon did not, but it laughed at his pluck,
Who so fearlessly thought such as he could defeat him;
Who fought with a blade that would sing when it struck
And now thwarted the dragon attempting to eat him.
And Faye from her tower beheld the combatants—
The dragon, Sir Richard, and Romance, his sword—
Adoring Sir Richard from her window lattice,
Who beat off the wyrm and now sought his reward.

But the hero had yet one more trial to come:
A question burned on to Faye’s lips;
Before he could take the good Faye to his home
She demanded him “Answer me this:
Tell me, What is the greatest pursuit for a man?”

“To love!” he replied. “For Love will endure!
The world is redeemed by the Love of all Lovers!
It is Love that inspires, enlightens the wooer;
There is nothing so fine, so ennobling and pure,
So come! be my bride! let us love one another!”

Ah, Love! thought the maiden, Yes let me be loved!
But sober and pond’ring her spirit resisted:
Though Richard had passion and zeal it insisted
His Romance could not be enough.

That Love was redeeming, Faye freely confessed—
But not the poor love that Sir Richard professed.
Indeed it was mighty, exciting, and grand!
But lofty? Not so! And not fit for command.
This earthly emotion that Richard adored
Would flout the injunctions of kings and the Lord.
So properly, Faye sent the cavalier hence,
And waited, still older, for some other prince.

High in her tower, another year gone,
Playing music the dragon ignored,
Now less of a lass, but still no less alone,
Yet still reading the words of her Lord.

And deep in the forest, Sir Michael rode forth,
Determined to rescue the unhappy Faye.
With helmet and shield and so mighty a sword
The hero had honored the blade with a name:
Spirit he called it, and with its good aid
He’d defended against the world’s mightiest villains.
So reaching the tower he masterfully bade
The dragon retreat, or he’d otherwise kill him.
The dragon did not, but blew his fell breath,
But the shield of the champion extinguished the flame;
Then a claw to his helmet—which saved him from death—
And Spirit struck back, so to make the wyrm lame.
The battle raged on; from her tower Faye watched,
Adoring the hero in armor so plain,
For hour and hour, until she was shocked
To behold that the dragon had finally been slain.

But the hero had yet one more trial to come:
A question burned on to Faye’s lips;
Before he could take the good Faye to his home
She demanded him “Answer me this:
Tell me, What is the greatest pursuit for a man?”

“To glorify God and enjoy Him forever,”
Sir Michael gave answer to Faye. “I confess
To you He is my Master and I am His debtor.
May God be involved in my every endeavor—
I prithee, fair maiden, assist me in this.”

At hearing these words, patient Faye gave a start—
Was Michael the suitor she’d been dreaming of?
“Not a Name?” tested she, “Or Passionate Love?
Are neither of these on your heart?”

“Oh, they are, as they are on the heart of the Lord,
And praised in the pages of His Holy Word.
A Name’s to be sought more than riches, says He;
My Name shall derive from the Lord and His deeds.
And Passionate Love is a thing to be praised,
When joined to the wisdom of Charity’s ways;
My Love shall proceed from my Charity then,
And that from the Lord who instructs holy men.”

Deep in the mountains, a maiden is faint:
Adoring a man who adores her good Lord.
How thankful she is that he’s finally arrived!
How thankful she is she’d been strengthened to wait!
So with joy and delight the two journey on toward
His home to become man and wife.

.

.

If you enjoyed that, you can read about some of the thought process that went into creating it here.

Also you can see a video of the poem being read on YouTube.

2 responses

  1. […] ahead—you had better read the poem “Faye” before reading about how I wrote […]

  2. […] this will be: not some ponderous clash, but rather some adventurous fun. Hm—I had better just post the whole poem, I think, instead of pulling other excerpts. Actually, I think later this week I’ll write a whole […]

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